Red Rose Cricket Books

Bolton Club and Ground XI v. Nottingham Commercial XI
  • Bolton Club and Ground XI v. Nottingham Commercial XI
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Significant 19th-century Cricket Matches in Bolton

Bolton Club and Ground XI v. Nottingham Commercial XI

Back-o'th'-Bank cricket ground on 23, 24 May 1873

K Martin Tebay

Published in 2018 by Red Rose Books

Original A5 card wrappers.

(4) + 11 + (1) pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 30 copies, signed and numbered by K. Martin Tebay.

The second in a series of cricketing monographs on significant 19th-century cricket matches played in Bolton, When Arthur met “Mac” is an account of the “Grand Cricket Match” that took place between a Bolton Club and Ground XI and a Nottingham Commercial XI at the Back o’th’-Bank cricket ground on 23, 24 May 1873. On opposing sides were two Nottinghamshire-born cricketers, one famous, the other soon to be famous. One the renowned Lancashire County and Bolton Cricket Club fast bowler Will McIntyre, often referred to by the cricketing folk of Bolton and its surrounding districts as “McIntyre the Famous,” or, more prosaically, “Mac,” the other a young batsman named Arthur Shrewsbury. McIntyre would dismiss Shrewsbury in both innings - but not before the 17 year old had made a favourable impression.

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United North of England XI v. Sixteen Lancashire Residents
  • United North of England XI v. Sixteen Lancashire Residents
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Significant 19th-century Cricket Matches in Bolton

United North of England XI v. Sixteen Lancashire Residents

Back-o'th'-Bank cricket ground on 14, 15, 16 July 1870

K Martin Tebay

Published in 2018 by Red Rose Books

Original A5 card wrappers.

(4) + 11 + (1) pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 30 copies, signed and numbered by K. Martin Tebay.

The “Grand Cricket Match at Bolton” took place at the Back-o’th’-Bank ground between the United North of England Eleven and Sixteen Lancashire Residents. In the weeks leading up to the match various improvements had been made to the ground. These improvements, together with fine weather and the appearance of two Regimental Bands, ensured that the event was an unqualified success. This, despite some early difficulties arising from the non appearance of several notable cricketers who had been expected to play. Notwithstanding a serious injury to one of the professional cricketers, the quality of the cricket during the three-day match was well-received by the cricket-loving patrons of Bolton. It featured as it did a century, and three half-centuries, one of which was obtained by the host cricket club’s senior professional Will McIntyre, who also took nine wickets in the match.

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RICHARD BOYS
  • RICHARD BOYS
  • RICHARD BOYS
  • RICHARD BOYS
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Richard Boys

Lesser-known Lancashire County Cricket Club First-class Cricketers. No. 1.

K Martin Tebay

Published in 2018 by Red Rose Books

Original A5 card wrappers.

(4) + 28 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 40 copies, signed and numbered by K. Martin Tebay.

This is the first in a series of cricketing monographs that will concentrate on the more obscure and lesser-known cricketers who have appeared in first-class cricket for Lancashire County Cricket Club. The initial subject, Richard Boys, was a renowned cricketer for Burnley Cricket Club during the latter part of the nineteenth century. A noted batsman and wicket-keeper, he would appear in only one first-class match, being selected to appear for the Lancashire County XI in their fixture against MCC at Lord’s on 7, 8 June 1877. Scottish by birth, his cricketing journey from the Lancashire mill town of Burnley to the hallowed turf of Lord’s via Massachusetts, and his prominent status in the early years of the Lancashire Cricket League, is noteworthy and ultimately tragic.

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NORFOLK’S SPLENDID INNINGS. A Record Score at Lord’s
  • NORFOLK’S SPLENDID INNINGS. A Record Score at Lord’s
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NORFOLK’S SPLENDID INNINGS

A Record Score at Lord’s

Stephen Musk

Published in 2017 by Red Rose Books

Original A5 card wrappers.

(iv) + 28 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 30 copies, signed and numbered by Stephen Musk.

That Norfolk ran up the huge total of 695 when playing against MCC in July 1885 is relatively familiar to followers of cricket in the late Victorian era. At the time, it was the highest score ever made at Lord’s. Norfolk’s first three batsmen each scored a century and the third wicket did not fall until the total had reached 509. This booklet describes this fascinating match in detail, using contemporary sources, and also places it in the context of the early history of the third Norfolk County Cricket Club, which was less than 10 years old. Whilst this match was being researched, it became clear that the various sources did not agree on every point. In fact, they differed in a large number of ways. These included not only relatively obscure matters such as batting and bowling orders, the number of boundaries hit, and the fall of wickets but also crucial areas such as individual scores of one batsman, the bowling analyses and even the identity of several of the players (two of who were playing under assumed names). The various bones of contention have been taken in turn and, wherever possible, a definitive decision has been reached as to which is likely to be the truthful version. In the light of this experience, the author suggests that uncorroborated match scores from this era should be treated with caution - as ‘best guesses’ rather than as the certain truth.

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LANCASHIRE C.C.C. WICKETKEEPERS: The Victorian Era
  • LANCASHIRE C.C.C. WICKETKEEPERS: The Victorian Era
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LANCASHIRE C.C.C. WICKETKEEPERS: The Victorian Era

Roy Cavanagh MBE

Published in 2017 by Red Rose Books

Original A5 textured red card wrappers.

(iv) + 24 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 100 copies, signed and numbered by Roy Cavanagh.

The first of what will be a series of limited edition booklets chronicling Lancashire County Cricket Club wicketkeepers from the first county match played in 1865 up to the present day, Lancashire C.C.C. Wicketkeepers: The Victorian Era is Roy Cavanagh’s debut innings for Red Rose Books and sees him look back at the early wicketkeepers who have appeared in first-class cricket for the county, more specifically those who kept wicket during the reign of Queen Victoria. In doing so, he has found instances of players not usually associated with the position of wicketkeeper; during the years 1865 to 1901 Lancashire luminaries such as Johnny Briggs, A.N. Hornby, A.G. Paul, E.B. Rowley, E.E. Steel, and Alec Watson, were all at one time or another required to take over the gloves when the regular wicketkeeper was either injured or unwell. Thirty-three wicketkeepers are noted, three of whom need little or no introduction to followers of Lancashire cricket: Richard Pilling, “The Prince of Wicketkeepers”, who died in 1891 at the early age of 35, when he was widely-acknowledged to be the best wicketkeeper in the world at that time; Arthur Kemble, who helped the county recover from Pilling’s untimely loss; and the Yorkshire-born Charles Smith, who, like Pilling, would win the County Championship with Lancashire in this period. UK post free, please e-mail for overseas postage & packing charges.

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“MONKEY’S” COUNTRY-HOUSE CRICKET GROUND… 1887
  • “MONKEY’S” COUNTRY-HOUSE CRICKET GROUND… 1887
  • “MONKEY’S” COUNTRY-HOUSE CRICKET GROUND… 1887
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“Monkey’s” Country-House Cricket Ground

Mr. A. N. Hornby’s XI versus XIV of Church Minshull, Wednesday, 8th June, 1887, at Parkfield House, Nantwich.

K Martin Tebay

Published by Red Rose Books in 2017

Original card wrappers.

(4) + 8 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 25 copies, signed and numbered by Martin Tebay.

On Wednesday, 8th June, 1887, Mr. A.N. Hornby, captain of Lancashire County and Manchester Cricket Club, opened a new cricket ground at his residence, Parkfield House, in Wellington Road, Nantwich. To celebrate the occasion, he led an eleven, which included several well-known Lancashire County professional cricketers, in an “odds” match against XIV of Church Minshull, which was ‘comprised of several of his old friends of the Church Minshull Cricket Club, with which he was intimately connected during his ten years’ residence in that neighbourhood previous to coming to Nantwich’, and local cricketers from the neighbouring village of Minshull Vernon. Boasting 16 rooms and set in approximately 20 acres of land, Parkfield House was bordered by stables on the one side, which housed Hornby’s ‘prancing hunters’, and by the beautifully rolled and levelled cricket ground on the other, the opening of which is the subject of this monograph.

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‘WORTHY CAUSES BOTH’. Charity Cricket Matches at Eagley. Bolton Cricket League v Lancashire County, 5th September, 1922 & 1923: K. Martin Tebay
  • ‘WORTHY CAUSES BOTH’. Charity Cricket Matches at Eagley. Bolton Cricket League v Lancashire County, 5th September, 1922 & 1923: K. Martin Tebay
  • ‘WORTHY CAUSES BOTH’. Charity Cricket Matches at Eagley. Bolton Cricket League v Lancashire County, 5th September, 1922 & 1923: K. Martin Tebay
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‘WORTHY CAUSES BOTH’.

Charity Cricket Matches at Eagley. Bolton Cricket League v Lancashire County, 5th September, 1922 & 1923

K Martin Tebay

Published by Red Rose Books, 2016

Original A5 textured red card wrappers, new.

iv + 24 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 33 copies, signed and numbered by Martin Tebay.

The visit of a Lancashire County XI to play a Bolton Cricket League XI at the ground of Eagley Cricket Club on 5th September, 1922, was manna from Heaven for the inhabitants of the cotton town. The visiting eleven included the Tottington-born Mr Myles N Kenyon, who had promised in the Spring of 1922 to bring a Lancashire County XI over to Bolton to raise funds for the town’s Schools and Workshops for the Blind, and professionals of the calibre of the “Worsley wonder” John Tommy Tyldesley and his younger brother Ernest, and two of the “Westhoughton Tyldesleys”, Dick and Jimmy. With over 4,000 spectators paying admission the charity match, unsurprisingly, was a great success. However, it was the last occasion that the Lancashire CCC professional cricketer James Darbyshire (Jimmy) Tyldesley, who had learned his trade playing for Westhoughton CC in the Bolton and District Cricket League, would be seen on a cricket field; barely four months later the talented all-rounder died in tragic circumstances in a Bolton nursing home. The sudden death of the popular cricketer came as a great shock to all Lancashire cricket followers and the Bolton and District Cricket League started a fund for the deceased’s widow and family in the Spring of 1923. After corresponding with the Lancashire CCC Committee throughout the summer, a benefit match was duly arranged; coincidentally, it was to take place exactly one year on from the previous match noted, at the same venue, and would feature many of the same players. Thankfully, the second match, too, was a success, and the booklet tells the story of both charity matches played at Eagley and recalls the funeral of Jimmy Tyldesley, attended by the great and the good of Lancashire cricket.

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GEORGE PILCH. ‘His Day in the Sun’: Stephen Musk
  • GEORGE PILCH. ‘His Day in the Sun’: Stephen Musk
  • GEORGE PILCH. ‘His Day in the Sun’: Stephen Musk
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GEORGE PILCH.

‘His Day in the Sun’

Stephen Musk

Published by Red Rose Books, 2016

Original A5 blue card wrappers, new.

iv + 32 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 88 copies, signed and numbered by Stephen Musk.

‘Old George’ Pilch, the great nephew of the legendary Fuller Pilch, was a talented all-round sportsman, representing the County of Norfolk at soccer, cricket, golf and bowls. In his later days he was a director of Norwich City FC and was a leading force in overseeing the construction of the ground at Carrow Road in a few weeks when their home ground at The Nest was condemned by the FA as unsafe. Pilch played cricket for Norfolk in the Minor Counties over a period of 22 years, from 1899 to 1921, but did very little to justify the selectors’ faith, finishing his career with a bowling average of nearly forty and a batting average of under nine. His bowling, though quick, was unsubtle and his batting depended largely on the ‘hoik’ to deep midwicket - in short he fell short of the standards expected of a regular county player, with his only plus point being his availability to turn out at short notice. And yet Pilch did have one day of utterly joyous triumph. Norfolk’s final match of the 1905 season saw them hosting Cambridgeshire in a match that they needed to win in order to carry off the Minor Counties Championship outright for the first time. On a filthy wicket, Norfolk struggled and, when Pilch went out to bat at number ‘nine’ in their second innings, their lead was a mere forty. Defeat stared them in the face. This book tells how Pilch, having been dropped off his usual ‘hoik’, went on to play the innings of any lifetime, hitting 88 in just 80 minutes, destroying Cambridgeshire’s morale and ensuring that title was Norfolk’s. In order to put this single, almost unbelievable innings in context, Pilch’s career as club and county cricketer is examined in detail and his life as a keen sportsman is recounted.

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The Life of John Briggs
  • The Life of John Briggs
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£19.95

The Life of John Briggs... Anecdotes, Recollections, Astounding Feats with Bat and Ball ...

Herbert Turner

Originally published in 1902.

Red Rose Books facsimile reprint published in 2000.

Introduction by Gerry Wolstenholme

Limited edition of 200 copies, signed and numbered by Gerry Wolstenholme.

Original maroon cloth and dustwrapper.

A fine, unread copy.

'The stirring deeds of the 'Boy' Briggs on the cricket field would always be remembered as his infectious love for the game of cricket endeared him to spectators and players alike.'

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First-class Cricketers from Rossall School
  • First-class Cricketers from Rossall School
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£11.95

First-class Cricketers from Rossall School: The Victorian Era

Gerry Wolstenholme

Published in 2012 by Red Rose Books. ISBN 9780957354005

Original stiffened wrappers. iv + 56 pages, illustrated.

Limited edition of 100 copies, signed & numbered by Gerry Wolstenholme.

'Rossall School on the north west coast of Lancashire opened in August 1844 with 70 boys and a headmaster, Dr John Woolley, who was a keen sportsman and who, in 1845 approved the formation of a cricket club. This was to be the beginning of a heritage that spawned a number of first-class cricketers, many of whom came to the fore in the Victorian era when Alfred Clarke and H H Stephenson, both of the All England XI, were coaches at the school. William Wingfield was the first Old Rossallian to play first-class cricket and he was quickly followed by such as Lancashire’s Rowley brothers, Alexander and Edmund, ...'

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