Softback edition - Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar
  • Softback edition - Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar
  • Softback edition - Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar
  • Softback edition - Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar

Softback edition - Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar

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Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar

Stephen Musk

Published on 28 July 2022 by Red Rose Books

Original pictorial card wrappers.

(iv) + 64 pages, illustrated.

Francis Terry was educated at Oxford University, where he failed to

UK post free only, please e-mail for overseas postage charges

Overcoming Stigma in Victorian Cricket The Remarkable Story of Francis Terry, Canada’s Mad Vicar

Stephen Musk

Published on 28 July 2022 by Red Rose Books

Original pictorial card wrappers.

(iv) + 64 pages, illustrated.

Francis Terry was educated at Oxford University, where he failed to impress, either as a scholar or a cricketer. He had more success when playing in 10 first-class matches for Somersetshire between 1882 and 1885, even scoring a century against Hampshire. However, he appeared to have left cricket behind him when he trained to be a minister in the Church of England and seemed to be destined for an unremarkable, if worthy, life. Alas, Terry was unfortunate to succumb to severe mental ill health problems and was obliged to stand down from the ministry. Perhaps in search of a new start, he emigrated to Canada in 1891 and started to play cricket once more. He quickly became established as one of the leading batsmen in North America. And, despite his mental problems being common knowledge, he was often selected to represent Canada against the USA. He was even asked to skipper his adopted country on two occasions. Terry continued to suffer from very poor mental health for the rest of his life but successfully battled, and batted, on. He made his last international appearance in 1907, when at the advanced age of 46, and played club cricket until his old age. Given the tremendous stigma attached to mental illness in the 19th century, his story can be described as one of an inspiring triumph over severe adversity. It is hard to imagine that anyone might follow in his footsteps, even in today’s supposedly more enlightened times.

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